The Story On My Skin… My blog - March 2018 – My blog
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March 2018

    Everyday Life

    Celebrating World Book Day

    Even as an adult, I find the energy around World Book Day exciting! Every year, on the 1st March, children set off to school dressed as characters from their favourite storybooks and spend the day celebrating stories and the importance of reading.

    As a young girl, I used to love reading. I was a big Judy Blume fan who brought us teen classics such as ‘Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret’ and ‘Iggie’s House’ and begged Mum to buy me the latest edition of Sweet Valley High when it was released, as I couldn’t get enough of Jessica and Elizabeth Wakefield, the most popular high school twins during the early 90’s!

    When I look back to most of the stories I read growing up, it’s only now, I realise just books that represented those with in-differences were sadly non-existent. I mean…could you ever imagine Belle from Beauty and the Beast having eczema or Vitiligo or a Disney character having some form of disability. That probably sounds incredibly far fetched, but why should it, after all these are people that represent those living a life in todays society.

    Things have moved on since my younger years thankfully, and we are seeing more books slowly emerging with characters that represent those like us, teaching us that we too are worthy of being characters in the fictional world. So of course, it only feels right, given what World Book Day is all about, that I give a round up of the books where characters with Vitiligo are taking the lead…

    Snow White & The Seven Patches by Jewel Kats

    This lovely story is a modern day version of the classic fairytale. With typical themes such as evil versus good, a poisonous apple and the magic mirror, the only big difference here is Snow White was born with beautiful, white patches. A book with great illustrations, a familiar storyline with an interesting twist…

    Saniyah Goes To The Zoo by Scott P Dawson and Saniyah Dawson

    There are so many things children with Vitiligo can face – bullying, staring and feelings of isolation and this is a story that tackles such themes. Saniyah goes to the zoo is about those very things children often face when they have an indifference. A great story that will teach your child how to handle and overcome such situations positively when they might feel like others are against them. One for teaching some of life’s simple lessons…

    Vitiligo Doesn’t Scare Me by Kim Kirkland

    The title of this book is so warming! Vitiligo Doesn’t Scare Me follows the journey of a little boy called Chris who discovers he has the condition after a visit to his GP. Naturally he becomes concerned and finds he is faced with a number of challenges because of his indifference. Throughout the story he faces a number of issues and feelings as he comes into contact with those who notice he has the condition and although he is aware his skin looks different in some places, having Vitiligo doesn’t scare him….

    A No Nonsense Guide to Vitiligo by Yan Valle

    Whilst this isn’t a story book as such, its still a great book that offers insight into Vitiligo. Recently published, The No Nonsense Guide to Vitiligo is what the Dermatology world, and those with Vitiligo are in need of. Up until recently, Vitiligo has often been regarded as a misunderstood condition, with many questions around treatment, management and what to do after diagnosis, remaining a ‘grey’ area. This guide is for those of you who have been looking for a better way to manage Vitiligo. In this smart and accessible book, Yan Valle – author, tireless campaigner and CEO of Vitiligo Research Foundation – cuts through the myths and misinformation that surround Vitiligo to tell you what you really need to know, covering themes such as potential triggers, how to feel confident about treatment options and how to detect the early signs of Vitiligo.

    Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina by Michaela De Prince

    This is the incredible story of Michaela De Prince (pictured), a successful young dancer who escaped a country riddled with war and set her sights on becoming a leading star in Ballet.

    She was infamously known as girl No 27 in the orphanage in which she lived, a place where she expected to feel safe, but instead became a place of abandonment when it was discovered she had a skin condition that turned her skin white. For that very reason she was known as the ‘Devil Child’. After suffering torment by those who were supposed to care for her, she was adopted by an American family who nurtured her love of dancing and which later lead to her becoming one of Ballets most successful stars…engaging, unforgettable and well worth the read…

    Photo by Serena Reidy Photography

     

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